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Docker Manifest

Since v0.148.0, GoReleaser supports building and pushing Docker multi-platform images through the docker manifest tool.

For it to work, it has to be enabled in the client configurations.

Please make sure docker manifest works before opening issues.

Notice that if you have something in the docker_manifests section in your config file, GoReleaser will add the manifest's to the release notes instead of the Docker images names.

Warning

Please note that this is a beta feature, and it may change or be removed at any time.

Customization

You can create several manifests in a single GoReleaser run, here are all the options available:

# .goreleaser.yml
docker_manifests:
  # You can have multiple Docker manifests.
-
  # Name template for the manifest.
  # Defaults to empty.
  name_template: foo/bar:{{ .Version }}

  # Image name templates to be added to this manifest.
  # Defaults to empty.
  image_templates:
  - foo/bar:{{ .Version }}-amd64
  - foo/bar:{{ .Version }}-arm64v8

  # Extra flags to be passed down to the manifest create command.
  # Defaults to empty.
  create_flags:
  - --insecure

  # Extra flags to be passed down to the manifest push command.
  # Defaults to empty.
  push_flags:
  - --insecure

  # Skips the docker manifest.
  # If you set this to 'false' or 'auto' on your source docker configs,
  #  you'll probably want to do the same here.
  #
  # If set to 'auto', the manifest will not be created in case there is an
  #  indicator of a prerelease in the tag, e.g. v1.0.0-rc1.
  #
  # Defaults to false.
  skip_push: false

Tip

Learn more about the name template engine.

How it works

We basically build and push our images as usual, but we also add a new section to our config defining which images are part of which manifests.

GoReleaser will create and publish the manifest in its publish phase.

Warning

Unfortunately, the manifest tool needs the images to be pushed to create the manifest, that's why we both create and push it in the publish phase.

Example config

In this example we will use Docker's --platform option to specify the target platform. This way we can use the same Dockerfile for both the amd64 and the arm64 images (and possibly others):

# Dockerfile
FROM alpine
ENTRYPOINT ["/usr/bin/mybin"]
COPY mybin /usr/bin/mybin

Then, on our GoReleaser config file, we need to define both the dockers and the docker_manifests section:

# .goreleaser.yml
builds:
- env:
  - CGO_ENABLED=0
  binary: mybin
  goos:
  - linux
  goarch:
  - amd64
  - arm64
dockers:
- image_templates:
  - "foo/bar:{{ .Version }}-amd64"
  use_buildx: true
  dockerfile: Dockerfile
  build_flag_templates:
  - "--platform=linux/amd64"
- image_templates:
  - "foo/bar:{{ .Version }}-arm64v8"
  use_buildx: true
  goarch: arm64
  dockerfile: Dockerfile
  build_flag_templates:
  - "--platform=linux/arm64/v8"
docker_manifests:
- name_template: foo/bar:{{ .Version }}
  image_templates:
  - foo/bar:{{ .Version }}-amd64
  - foo/bar:{{ .Version }}-arm64v8

Warning

Notice that --platform needs to be in the Docker platform format, not Go's.

That config will build the 2 Docker images defined, as well as the manifest, and push everything to Docker Hub.